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Comments

  • OhTheHugeManatee

    OhTheHugeManatee

    March 10, 2015, 5:05 pm

    thanks for the non-downvote and the well thought out response. I want to make the distinction: this isn't about relative judgments of art forms, this is judgments of individual musicians, which transcends art forms. I'm not a Jazz musician, but Ella Fitzgerald was a fantastic singer. I don't have to be a jazz saxophonist to appreciate how amazing Coltrane was. I definitely don't sing musical theater, but they have some really solid singers in that field. It's actually why I avoided opera singers as a comparison, because it's not about "my art form is better than your art form."

    I'm talking about just gaga's abilities as a singer. The OP called her a "child prodigy" because she turned down a Juilliard youth program and went to an arts college. OP and commenters then proceeded to fawn all over her singing in the acoustic example provided. That's what I'm responding to.

    I like the piece of music she plays in the clip, so far as it goes. I even appreciate the emotion that she conveys. Lots of people sing with a emotion (Paul Potts, any voice student, one of my conductors if you let him), but that doesn't make them good singers. Jesus, if you could hear this conductor... it sounds like he's gargling rusty nails with a dying cat in his throat. but MAN he's into it, and WOW does he convey emotion. But I would never confuse him for a "good singer"... and certainly not for a prodigy.

    Reply

  • Fimbulfamb

    Fimbulfamb

    March 11, 2015, 7:19 am

    I was opposed to it at the time, especially the government's handling of the thing. (The minister for the environment, who wore leather trousers at the time, reverted the ruling of a panel of scientists who said the damage to geese's and reindeer's breeding grounds would be a lot, because she thought the land was barren.) But in hindsight, there could've been worse places, *now* I think the stupidest thing is rather using the 650MW for aluminum production. If we could use them more wisely and with some innovation, I'd be happy. (That said, there's a new aluminum smelter underway, and they haven't even gotten a contract for the energy yet. The dam for that energy would be placed in two places in the same river, both within a couple of kilometers of where I live.)

    Reply

  • adaminc

    adaminc

    March 10, 2015, 3:40 pm

    Hello people!

    An ultraportable and a netbook aren't the same thing. What this guy wants is something like the HP TX2 or Compaq TC4400, or the Thinkpad X series, a full power laptop in a smaller/lighter form factor.

    The problem I have found with these ultraportables is that they are loud (fan noise), and usually get quite warm, since they are much more compact than regular sized laptops.

    You can pick up a HP TX2 brand new for about $800-$900. It is a 2.1GHz AMD Turion X2 processor, ATI Radeon HD 3200 Graphics, 8 GB RAM, 500 GB HDD (5400 RPM), Bluetooth, integrated webcam, 8x DVD burner, VGA out and a digital pen, since it is a convertible tablet w/ a capactive multitouch screen.

    Or you could go the cheap route, and pick up something like the Compaq TC4400, and throw a SSD in it and some extra ram. I know a few people who have gone this route instead of buying a brand new laptop and they love it, I am tempted to do it instead of buying a MSI Wind U123.

    But the battery life of Ultraportables is nothing like Netbooks, and I want the battery life, 7 hours is nice. Also, as for the weight, some people have back problems and want to keep total carrying weight down. :)

    Reply

  • WTFppl

    WTFppl

    March 11, 2015, 2:04 am

    Because of this plea for recognition in a choice made by someone who is really no-one, in the grand scope of things, I'm now going to un-subscribe from reddit/self as these IAmA and DAE are becoming very stupid and making me feel even more detached from the human condition(caring). Mainly because the things that these self-redditors want me to worry about is one of their vice choices that lead to tragedy or a profound sense of their existance.

    I'm here at Reddit to learn about what is happening on the political and social fringe. Not hear to read about some dumb fucks fling with a girl who is really a dude.

    There are more important issues in the world than butt-fucking a pillow-biter... Things like, 'you and me being ripped off by the corporatocracy'. Get it?

    Reply

  • amirightORamiright

    amirightORamiright

    March 10, 2015, 1:02 pm

    I'll say it again: rap music is not synonymous with hip hop music. There is rap music that is distinct from hip hop music. Context is important. Rap is a verb, and rap is also a noun describing the result of rapping. I can google for definitions too, but it's not really productive:

    "rap

    A form of pop music characterized by spoken or chanted rhymed lyrics, with a syncopated, repetitive accompaniment. Rap music originated in the second half of the twentieth century in black urban communities. (See also hip-hop.)"

    Nobody's saying that rap isn't a verb, it's just also a noun.

    No sense trying to box in a genre or eliminate a word. Open your eyes, read some of the canonical texts in the field. Open your ears, and try to hear what the texts describe. You may just learn something.

    Reply

  • 6553321

    6553321

    March 10, 2015, 10:51 pm

    Okay so there are a couple of things at ply here. When you write printf("print something"), or for that matter any function, your compiler takes your parameters and puts them in a place where the called function can find them. Then it calls the function. The code will look something like this:

    label:

    store address of "print something"

    jump and link to printf // jump and link is in instruction that tells the processor how to get back once it gets done with the funciton

    any cleanup we need to do from the call

    goto label

    So when you put label there it contains the memory address of the first step needed to call printf that is put the arguments in a place where they can be found by printf.

    Reply

  • supertoned

    supertoned

    March 10, 2015, 2:35 pm

    No, the open-ness is fine. The problem comes in that there is no real content outside of the 'on rails' missions. If there were any sort of real A.I. in control of the wandering merchants, citizens, or raiders, it would be a completely different kettle of fish.

    As it stands, raiders are spawned in certain areas, and have one A.I. pattern only: To attack the player on sight. Citizens follow a routine mindless loop, as to traders. The wide wide world is, in reality, predictable and stale, and the player can not create his own stories inside of it, unless you consider killing everyone you meet a story.

    These open worlds are great in theory, but what is the point of building a play area the size of Washington D.C., and not putting any play content in it?

    Reply

  • hivpoz

    hivpoz

    March 10, 2015, 12:38 pm

    re: oral sex - I don't think there's been any proven cases of transmission via oral sex. It is generally considered to be safe. Now, if you've just flossed and your gums are bleeding or had dental surgery or something you might be at higher risk.

    re: broken condom - the realities of sex is that it causes little bits of damage to some very delicate tissues (both men and women), every single time, no matter how much lube you use. So if you're getting laid at all, there are lots of little tears/scrapes/chafing that HIV can use to sneak in. You don't have to be bleeding to be vulnerable. You only need one submicroscopic copy of the virus to find its way in, and you've contracted HIV.

    Reply

  • pbrocoum

    pbrocoum

    March 11, 2015, 1:29 am

    It is interesting. Practically speaking, there is a big difference between being able to do something once, and being able to do it an infinite number of times. If you could play Deal or No Deal every day for the rest of your life, it makes a lot of sense to always base your decision on the expected value, because you know it will average out to you having more money in the long run.

    When you only get to play the game once, the question is less about probability than about how much you can afford to lose. When the banker offers you $500,000, you actually HAVE that money, guaranteed. Would you spend $500,000 on a mere 50% chance of winning $1 million? Probably not. However, if you are already a billionaire, $500,000 is pocket change, and you might as well take the bet.

    Reply

  • jrohila

    jrohila

    March 10, 2015, 11:46 am

    Few explanations...

    The election financing laws in most, if not in all, European Union countries are much stricter than in the USA.

    Lobbying in Brussels is very regulated business itself and you can't just left a suitcase full of money somewhere and pretend that you are not watching.

    In many countries parties themselves get funding directly from the state depending on how many representatives they have in parliament thus there is less need for outside money.

    European industries, while objecting to this kind of legislation do understand that being in compliance with the legislation costs money so does it too cost money for foreign companies and thus makes the European markets for foreign companies less lucrative. In essence, European companies protect their home market by increasing the regulation.

    Reply

  • bluequail

    bluequail

    March 11, 2015, 2:25 am

    I think you need to realize that she may just be one of those girls that complain about how she is being treated by her SO to everyone... and that no matter who she is with, she is going to be that way. If you are with her, then everyone is going to think that you are the asshole that can't treat his gal right.

    I wonder often. Especially as women get older, when you get groups of them sitting together, they will all start complaining about the men they are with. I don't do that, so I don't get to join in the commiserating. But I often think, while listening to them complain that I would either fix the problem or leave. I can't see wasting my one and only life being as unhappy as they sound. Yet they are content to tolerate behavior that sounds intolerable... and they stay and complain. Personally I think they just enjoy complaining.

    Reply

  • OhTheHugeManatee

    OhTheHugeManatee

    March 10, 2015, 10:34 pm

    So, what's your instrument? If you hear a 10 year old playing your instrument, with INCREDIBLE FEELING but no ability at all, would you ever confuse that with a great instrumentalist?

    I am not trying to say that Gaga's product doesn't have value. I am trying to say that the value she brings is not empirically "good" singing. Fyodor Chaliapin was a TERRIBLE singer, but was one of the greatest operatic performers of the 20th century. It's OK, people can be bad singers and still contribute to music. But we should not confuse their contribution with "good singing."

    Reply

  • omginternets

    omginternets

    March 11, 2015, 7:17 am

    Let me guess... people told you college was going to be an absolute thrill, you were going to make hundreds of friends, every day was going to be a bast, etc...

    I had the same problem when I went to college. Instead of making friends, I made drinking buddies, and I quickly realized that not every part of college was exciting.

    The only advice I can give you is to try to join some sort of club. It doesn't even really matter what the club is, it'll expose you to people with similar interests. Also, don't limit yourself to on-campus clubs, necessarily. I found an MMA gym in my town and joined up and went from having relatively few friends, to having a base of people I can hang out with when I feel like getting out of my apartment.

    Don't worry too much. What you're going through is normal. It's a classic case of what you expected vs what was actually the case. Few people are more exaggerative advertisers than college students.

    Reply

  • rusrs

    rusrs

    March 10, 2015, 6:00 pm

    > I doubt that. Don't take my perspective into account at all though - just do some objective research on it. Go find all the forum posts you can that start with a "sigh" and you'll soon see what that (rhetorical) meaning of the "sigh" is.

    A sigh is a lot less negative than your implication that I don't understand its rhetorical message. You can't be serious.

    > All I did was demonstrate that your "case in point" was not, in fact, a case in point because the case in point you used can easily be demonstrated to show the opposite of what you're trying to show.

    You created a tangent and managed to thoroughly confuse yourself. I noted that an entire functional operating system has been developed outside the reward system of copyright -- several in fact. There is no hypothetical here; I am using one of them right now.

    Separately I noted that, in the absence of software patents the quality of these free systems would be vastly improved. I apologize if I was not clear; this is a separate observation.

    > I am certainly not incorrect ... I've stated something as a fact.

    Not true. Here's what you said:

    > "The natural reward for creating is the creation" isn't true except for a very small group of idealistic artistic types, the rest of the world believes the reward is money

    That is your opinion. In contrast, I offered several real scenarios that defy your opinion. Your response is, apparently, to repeat yourself.

    > In other words, it deserves a sigh as a rhetorical method of disagreement. That form of rhetorical method is widely regarded as invalid because it doesn't rely on logic or any form of "truth", it relies on argumentation by character (it's a weak form of ad-hominem)

    It's absolutely a character statement, a personal note from me to you. It is my hope that you take note, and change your character.

    I agree it adds no value to the logical progression of the discussion; note that I also provided you a reference, which you then ignored.

    > I understand what copyleft is all about.

    You don't, and you're arrogant to boot. Here's what I already wrote, quoted again:

    > *Under current law, material in the public domain can be incorporated into a work under intellectual restriction. The only way to prevent your work from falling under intellectual restrictions is to use a license designed specifically to counter those restrictions. That is what copyleft is all about.*

    You seem fixated on showing that I advocate the use of copyright to limit copyright -- yet I have never said otherwise. In fact, I explicitly noted this several times above. You need to refocus; you're having a conversation that finished some time ago.

    Reply

  • ElectricRebel

    ElectricRebel

    March 11, 2015, 2:03 am

    "In a free market, those businesses would have failed, and they would have lost all of their money."

    That is part of the problem with your thinking. Free markets don't exist. As long as the government exists, if the financial system is about to collapse, there will be bail outs.

    "The CRA was a part of the overall stimulus, not the major cause."

    I'm glad you can admit that.

    Overall, I think we are in agreement on something: we both hate crony capitalism. Both the government and the private industry were responsible for this mess. The main reason was because private industry (in particular, Goldman Sachs) managed to take over the government.

    However, our solutions are different. My solution is to revert to a previous era (the Glass-Steagall era) that worked very well and your solution is to create a fantasy world (a truly free market) that has never existed. If you can describe a way to make a free market that guarantees no intervention regardless of how bad things get, then I'm all ears. However, I believe such a system is not stable and is begging for new oligarchs to come in and abuse their power.

    On a side note, you said:

    "The falling worth of the US dollar is also a major contribution."

    Where is your evidence for this? Sure, the dollar declined a bit compared to the Euro, but that was because of the creation of a huge, new economic block that had little to do with the US central banking system. If anything, the artificial inflation of the US dollar (in particular caused by the Chinese's currency practices) has hurt US exports in recent years.

    "The dollar today is worth 4% of what it was in 1920."

    Honestly, I don't think anyone cares if they bury a dollar bill in their backyard in 1920 and when they dig it up and it's worth 4 cents in 2009. The economy moves a bit faster than that. If someone chooses to do that, they are rightly punished for not contributing to the economy by spending that dollar or putting it into a savings account. I've always thought that long term inflation is a lame argument. Of course, I do care very much about short term inflation, but that's a separate issue from what you described. Overall, small positive inflation is an incentive to participate. That is why everyone outside of the Austrian school wants it.

    "Yes, people's irresponsibility makes them lose money. In a free market this would cause a smaller recession and cause the destruction of banks with bad policy, as well as put irresponsible people in debt."

    How so? Have you ever read about the 1800s?

    A simple example to refute your point is deposit insurance. The more "free market" solution is to not have it. But, as history demonstrates, this causes bank runs. Hell, the biggest problem in 2008 was the run on the completely unregulated "shadow" banking system, which were institutions that worked like banks (i.e. made long term investments on short term borrowing) but were not regulated like banks. It was the more free market style aspects of the system that caused the subprime bubble bursting to go to a full blown stock market crash.

    Reply

  • rsayers

    rsayers

    March 11, 2015, 8:21 am

    Yes. Growing up poor helped, my dad fixed everything, even though I am better off now (software dev) I still just do things on my own. I just finished rebuilding the engine in my wifes car.

    I also pulled an office space several years ago and quit my long-time job to go work in construction. At the end of the day, renovating a house is MUCH more rewarding than building yet another ecommerce site for some company. If the pay was better, i would much rather work with my hands.

    Getting into ham radio helped as well, I went from knowing virtually nil about electronics to being able to grok schematics pretty well and not being afraid to break out the soldering iron.

    Reply

  • locke2002

    locke2002

    March 11, 2015, 9:08 am

    The only thing I've read in here so far that I find compelling is the idea that it's a convoluted way to avoid paying taxes on the money involved. I don't really understand how that would work...

    I don't find it appalling, based on what I know about it. If a corporation wants to insure on the life of an employee, and some company is willing to issue an insurance policy, and otherwise all else is the same for the employee, I don't see why that's disgusting and morally outrageous. Might be a good idea to update the terminology from "Dead Peasant" though.

    Reply

  • theroguesstash

    theroguesstash

    March 11, 2015, 5:40 am

    Well, Sport, it's been fun verbally abusing you and I hope you've had fun verbally abusing me, but it looks like this conversation/argument/debate is starting to get into cliched territory. I've nothing new to add, no new angle to throw at you and suspect you're not going to say anything I haven't heard already either. Let's face it, neither of us are getting anywhere, and I've got far too much to do to have a protracted debate with a stranger. You're more than welcome to try, but I believe that this difference in opinion comes down to whether or not you feel social responsibility should be legislated. I will finish by saying that I do, but only for the sake that it's easier, and I believe more effective. Even with the threat of eventual gov't corruption and abuse. So I hope to butt heads with you again sometime and sincerely hope that you and yours don't become another health care horror story I read about here. Also: I find it hilarious that you actually responded to the 'D)' bullet, twice. Good on ya.

    You're more than welcome to the last word, of course, if you want to call me a coward, or out of arguments, or defeated, etc.

    Reply

  • wallja

    wallja

    March 10, 2015, 12:04 pm

    This man living in one of the most luxurious palaces of world however recently announced that the spread of “western materialism” is the greatest threat that the continent of Africa now faces.

    The hunger and desperation that awaits the millions of new little Catholics in that continent is of no interest for this cold and hard-hearted man. He is quite willing to sacrifice them at the altar of his idiotic and old-fashioned dogma that is threatening this continent with future of steadily increasing despair, poverty and hunger.

    Reply

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